Welcome.

I'm Hannah: mother, wife, photographer, writer, artist, wellness enthusiast and lover of the simple and beautiful. I live in South Florida with my husband Manny, our three children (Seth, Isaac, and Eaden), and our golden doodle Lily.
This is my journal of motherhood, homeschooling, health, and living with grace & intention

The Process of Simplicity

The Process of Simplicity

I think I've held back from writing here very often because I haven't known where to begin. There are so many topics I want to write about, and yet none that I have polished and totally figured out. I'm curious about so much, but rarely an expert. But rather than getting overwhelmed and running away (again), I'm going to just pick one thing and talk about it. And then another, and another, without having to map out some kind of organized game plan ahead of time. (That's probably what most bloggers do anyway. I most likely overthink it.)

So today, simplicity is on my mind. I feel like it's become a somewhat overused term. It's thrown around a lot—"live simply" or "I'm simplifying"—but what does it mean? Personally, when I consider the idea of simplicity I picture an all-encompassing lifestyle, steeped in an appreciation for the beauty of everyday moments. I envision a home that is fairly minimal, but more importantly, contains only what is useful or beautiful (and hopefully both). I desire to carefully consider what we bring into our home, and what we keep here. I want quality over quantity. In a culture as materialistic as ours is, possessions are definitely one of the biggest obstacles to a simpler life. But there is so much more to it than only stuff. It applies to the way we spend our time, the way we eat, the way we treat illness and what we clean our homes with. My goal is not only to declutter, but to create an atmosphere in my home that is simple and peaceful and makes space for joy, creativity, movement, and the pursuit of knowledge.

We have come a long way in this area, but still have so far we can go. It is a process, and happens on a continuum. Every time we're faced with the option to bring another new thing into our lives, we can exercise simplicity. Do I need this? What will it add to my life? Will I still want it in a week? a month? a year? Is there a version of this item that will last longer, work better, or be more aesthetically pleasing? How was it made—where, and by whom? These are all questions I aim to consider when making purchases.

This has meant moving away from plastics and disposable items, and choosing to pay more, once, for something that will last rather than opting for a cheap item that will break or wear out.

Along with seemingly everyone and their mother (am I right?) I read The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo last year. In case you aren't familiar, this book takes you step-by-step through the process of editing down the things you own, based on the simple question "Does this spark joy?" So I read this, and then proceeded to "Konmarie" our home, and over the course of a few weeks we carted off about two pickup trucks worth of stuff to the local non-profit we donate to (which gives directly to the families of farm workers in the area—I prefer this option over Goodwill/Salvation Army because I know these things are being used by people in need). We also discarded several large black trash bags of unusable items like broken toys, clothes worn to rags, and so so many bottles of expired or half-used cosmetics and toiletries from under the sink. It was absurd. It was rather shocking to see that we'd been holding on to so much that we didn't need, want, or use anymore.

That whole process definitely made an impact on me and caused me to consider our habits of consumption. But I'm still training myself, and unfortunately I've still purchased/accumulated some things since then that ended up being mistakes. Like I said, it's a process. Every few months or so I get the "declutter" itch again, and I sweep through the house collecting items to get rid of. As the seasons change, some toys stop getting played with, some books are outgrown or could serve someone else much better, some clothes are just not getting any love and therefore not earning their place in the drawer or closet.

I recently thoroughly enjoyed reading Simple Mattersby Erin Boyle. I think every once in a while I need a good infusion of simplicity inspiration in book form. This one is just beautiful, and has me thinking all over again about the beauty and quality of each thing we own, and the social and environmental impact of it's production and eventual discard. And so the process of creating a more peaceful and minimal home and life continues. I'll keep you posted.

Homeschool overview, Grade 1

Homeschool overview, Grade 1

A Health Update {Hashimoto's, pregnancy, fertility, and food}

A Health Update {Hashimoto's, pregnancy, fertility, and food}